BLACK NDNS

BLACK NDNs. "If you know I have a history, you will respect me."

peyoteflower submitted:

Video (pt.1) from the Instituto Latinoamericano de la Comunicacion Educativa about the Black Seminole ndns who settle in Coahuila and formed the town El Nacimiento de los Negros.

30 Plays

SundayMorning Live podcast on “Black Indians” from 2/19/11

Guests:

Phil Wilkes Fixico- African-Native American activist, is a Seminole Maroon Descendant, Creek and Cherokee Freedmen descendant, Honorary Heniha for the Wildcat/John Horse Band of the Texas Seminoles, California Semiroon Mico, Member of the Los Angeles Chapter of the Buffalo Soldiers 9th & 10th (horse) Cavalry and the Seminole Negro Indian Scouts of Brackettville, Texas.

William Katz is the author of "Black Indians" and over 40 books on history.  He specializes in the history of Black Indians and the relationships between the two groups. www.WilliamKatz.com

For more information visit www.SundayMorningLive.net.

Jan Carew - Black Seminoles - Pt 1

Rebellion: John Horse and the Black Seminoles

Explore the story of John Horse and the Black Seminoles, the first black rebels to beat American slavery and leaders of the largest slave rebellion in U.S. history


John Horse and the Second Seminole War (1835–1842)
The Seminoles were a union of Southeastern Indian peoples—especially  Creeks—who had lost their lands to English colonists and moved into  Spanish-controlled Florida, along with independent communities of  escaped black slaves, who became known as Black Seminoles.
John Horse was a powerful figure in the war that the Seminoles waged  with the United States to fend off forced removal from Florida to  Oklahoma. Unwilling to accept a restricted life of defeat in Indian  Territory, he led a band of Black Seminoles into Mexico, where he died  in 1882.
Courtesy UTSA’s Institute of Texan Cultures, #068-1107; Courtesy of the artist Kate M. W. Oliver [Source]

John Horse and the Second Seminole War (1835–1842)

The Seminoles were a union of Southeastern Indian peoples—especially Creeks—who had lost their lands to English colonists and moved into Spanish-controlled Florida, along with independent communities of escaped black slaves, who became known as Black Seminoles.

John Horse was a powerful figure in the war that the Seminoles waged with the United States to fend off forced removal from Florida to Oklahoma. Unwilling to accept a restricted life of defeat in Indian Territory, he led a band of Black Seminoles into Mexico, where he died in 1882.

Courtesy UTSA’s Institute of Texan Cultures, #068-1107; Courtesy of the artist Kate M. W. Oliver [Source]

Early encounters between Africans and Seminoles can be traced to seventeenth-century Florida, with the Spanish serving as a proxy connecting the two cultures. Enslaved Africans in the British colony of South Carolina found refuge and greater freedom under Spanish rule in Florida. The Seminoles, who had broken from the Creek Confederacy and settled in Florida, also found more friendly allies in the Spanish. Africans soon began to live in Seminole communities and establish alliances with Seminole towns. Some Seminoles took Africans as slaves, although their practice differed dramatically from that of invading colonizers.
Smithsonian: National Museum of the American Indian, indiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americans, p. 46. (via daydreamingbookworm)

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adailyriot:

Diana Fletcher
Diana Fletcher was born about 1838 in Indian Territory (now Oklahoma); her death date and place are unknown. Diana’s  father was born in Virginia; his parents were born in Africa and  brought to America as slaves. While still a young child he was sold to a  man who lived in Florida, ran away, and lived with the Seminole  Indians. He married a Seminole woman who died on “The Trail of Tears”  (the forced relocation of Indians to Oklahoma). Diana learned  traditional Kiowa crafts from her step-mother: sewing, cooking, tanning  buffalo hides, making teepees, and basketweaving. Some sources say Diana  taught fellow Native Americans. When the members of the tribe  raised enough money, they built a small school and hired a teacher. The  Black Indian schools were operated by what are known as ‘The Five  Civilized Tribes’: the Creek, Chicasaw, Cherokee, Choctaw, and Seminole.  Diana valued and preserved her family’s history, culture and  values, while, at the same time, learning to adjust and adapt to white  American society. Because of ignorance, prejudice and racial  hostility, the U.S. government attempted to force Black Indians, as well  as all Native Americans, to reject their heritage. Because people  like Diana maintained their traditions, we can now learn about their  important contributions to the history of America.Some sources say  Diana attended the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute in Virginia  (later called the Hampton Institute), although listings of students do  not reflect this. The Hampton government boarding school was opened for  Black students in 1868, with the intent of educating by training “the  head, the hand, and the heart” so pupils could return to their  communities as leaders and professionals among their people. In  1878, the institute opened its doors to Indians. The following year, in a  grand experiment led by Capt. Richard Henry Pratt, the Carlisle Indian  Industrial School in Carlisle, Pennsylvannia, was opened as a way to  assimilate Indians into “civilized” society, although without the intent  of returning graduates to their communities. Kiowa Indians, as well as thousands of Native Americans from many other tribes, attended these schools.

adailyriot:

Diana Fletcher

Diana Fletcher was born about 1838 in Indian Territory (now Oklahoma); her death date and place are unknown.
Diana’s father was born in Virginia; his parents were born in Africa and brought to America as slaves. While still a young child he was sold to a man who lived in Florida, ran away, and lived with the Seminole Indians. He married a Seminole woman who died on “The Trail of Tears” (the forced relocation of Indians to Oklahoma).
Diana learned traditional Kiowa crafts from her step-mother: sewing, cooking, tanning buffalo hides, making teepees, and basketweaving. Some sources say Diana taught fellow Native Americans.
When the members of the tribe raised enough money, they built a small school and hired a teacher. The Black Indian schools were operated by what are known as ‘The Five Civilized Tribes’: the Creek, Chicasaw, Cherokee, Choctaw, and Seminole.
Diana valued and preserved her family’s history, culture and values, while, at the same time, learning to adjust and adapt to white American society.
Because of ignorance, prejudice and racial hostility, the U.S. government attempted to force Black Indians, as well as all Native Americans, to reject their heritage.
Because people like Diana maintained their traditions, we can now learn about their important contributions to the history of America.
Some sources say Diana attended the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute in Virginia (later called the Hampton Institute), although listings of students do not reflect this. The Hampton government boarding school was opened for Black students in 1868, with the intent of educating by training “the head, the hand, and the heart” so pupils could return to their communities as leaders and professionals among their people.
In 1878, the institute opened its doors to Indians. The following year, in a grand experiment led by Capt. Richard Henry Pratt, the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Carlisle, Pennsylvannia, was opened as a way to assimilate Indians into “civilized” society, although without the intent of returning graduates to their communities.
Kiowa Indians, as well as thousands of Native Americans from many other tribes, attended these schools.

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