BLACK NDNS

BLACK NDNs. "If you know I have a history, you will respect me."

chocol8luv:

“In 1893, the Dawes Rolls was created by the United States government, recording every known Cherokee into three categories: freedmen, intermarried whites and Cherokee. There was a great deal of resistance from the Cherokees against the rolls because they assigned land, benefits and money along racial lines. Despite the fact that some Indians refused to join the rolls out of protest and some whites with only tangential connections to the Cherokee got on the rolls to get free land, the Dawes Rolls have remained the legal final say as to who is and who is not an American Indian in the United States.
This set the stage for the racial battles that current Chief Chad Smith is exploiting to ensure his re-election. The Treaty of 1866 required that all  freedmen be accepted as full citizens into the Cherokee nation as part of southern reconstruction.”

chocol8luv:

“In 1893, the Dawes Rolls was created by the United States government, recording every known Cherokee into three categories: freedmen, intermarried whites and Cherokee. There was a great deal of resistance from the Cherokees against the rolls because they assigned land, benefits and money along racial lines. Despite the fact that some Indians refused to join the rolls out of protest and some whites with only tangential connections to the Cherokee got on the rolls to get free land, the Dawes Rolls have remained the legal final say as to who is and who is not an American Indian in the United States.

This set the stage for the racial battles that current Chief Chad Smith is exploiting to ensure his re-election. The Treaty of 1866 required that all  freedmen be accepted as full citizens into the Cherokee nation as part of southern reconstruction.”

(via chocol8luv-deactivated20120308)

Sarann Knight Preddy, Entrepreneur

Sarann Knight Preddy provides a unique perspective on women and gaming, as the first black woman to receive a Nevada gaming license.

Born on July 27, 1920, in Eufaula, Oklahoma, she migrated to Las Vegas in 1942 with her parents and husband. They settled in the Las Vegas black community, the Westside, and because her father was a carpenter, immediately built a home. Many African Americans lived in tents and shacks due to the lack of materials caused by the war, coupled with the challenge blacks faced when attempting to purchase real property. Obtaining the financing necessary for a car was different. Preddy remembered that it was not unusual to see a big, impressive, shiny new car in front of a shack because everybody was working and had money, but blacks just could not seem to qualify for a home loan.

Preddy gravitated to Jackson Street, the black business district, to seek employment, and soon became a Keno writer in the Cotton Club. The business district was peppered with a series of nightclubs, restaurants, beauty and barber shops, clothing establishments, and small grocery stores. Preddy gained business acumen in the gaming industry, and when her husband accepted an employment opportunity in Hawthorne, Nevada, she joined him and became the owner of her first gaming venue. For $600, which she borrowed from her father, she bought Hawthorne’s one club for blacks, renamed it the Tonga Club, and operated it for seven years. The gaming license she obtained for that club gave Preddy the distinction of being the first black to own a gaming license in Nevada. She remembers the club becoming successful as a result of her barbecue sauce recipe, in addition to the games of chance.

Preddy returned to Las Vegas after the Moulin Rouge Hotel Casino, the first integrated resort property in Las Vegas, opened and closed in 1955. She operated the Playhouse Lounge for a year before going to work at Jerry’s Nugget as an experiment. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) had been told that Jerry’s Nugget would hire a black dealer if the association could send in a qualified person. Preddy accepted the challenge, intending to work at the North Las Vegas casino for six months. She stayed there for seven years. She remembers a congenial environment where profit-sharing was one of the benefits. [READ MORE]


Sarann Knight Preddy bears the distinction of being the first woman of color to own both a non-restricted gaming license and a major hotel in the United States. She was born in Eufaula, Oklahoma, in 1920 to a wealthy family with a deep appreciation for their richly mixed culture. Her mother was a member of the Muskogee (Creek) Nation and was of more Muskogee descent than black; her father was a businessman, musician, and professional baseball player of black, Spanish, and European heritage. Her family owned several successful businesses, and because they viewed their abundance with a cultural perspective that did not permit boasting or selfishness, they did not succumb to the pitfalls sometimes associated with wealth in mainstream America. Sarann’s major influences growing up were her parents, who created a caring home that always had a heart for others in the community. …. When asked about her Native heritage, Sarann explained:
"My Native heritage means a great deal. Knowing the history of my Native ancestors made me more interested in my mother, the tribe, and what they went through. It made me more concerned. Out of respect, I wanted to continue to carry on the things that I learned. All of my ancestry has contributed to making me a unique person; I am proud of that and I would like to know even more about my heritage. People today are looking up their heritage and finding things out, and I think that’s great. As for me, I have always known; it’s something that’s built in. "

Excerpt from Tiffini Bowers’ essay “Sarann Knight Preddy”, which is included in  indiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americans.

[Image Source]

Sarann Knight Preddy bears the distinction of being the first woman of color to own both a non-restricted gaming license and a major hotel in the United States. She was born in Eufaula, Oklahoma, in 1920 to a wealthy family with a deep appreciation for their richly mixed culture. Her mother was a member of the Muskogee (Creek) Nation and was of more Muskogee descent than black; her father was a businessman, musician, and professional baseball player of black, Spanish, and European heritage. Her family owned several successful businesses, and because they viewed their abundance with a cultural perspective that did not permit boasting or selfishness, they did not succumb to the pitfalls sometimes associated with wealth in mainstream America. Sarann’s major influences growing up were her parents, who created a caring home that always had a heart for others in the community. …. When asked about her Native heritage, Sarann explained:

"My Native heritage means a great deal. Knowing the history of my Native ancestors made me more interested in my mother, the tribe, and what they went through. It made me more concerned. Out of respect, I wanted to continue to carry on the things that I learned. All of my ancestry has contributed to making me a unique person; I am proud of that and I would like to know even more about my heritage. People today are looking up their heritage and finding things out, and I think that’s great. As for me, I have always known; it’s something that’s built in. "

Excerpt from Tiffini Bowers’ essay “Sarann Knight Preddy”, which is included in indiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americans.

[Image Source]

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